Plant the seeds of literacy

By Norah Colvin

This is a repost of a blog by Norah Colvin. I’ve been following Norah’s blog for quite a while, she always has current spot-on information about early childhood education. Norah lives in Australia, where she is a teacher, a writer and founder of ReadiLearn, a collection of early childhood teaching resources. Books are Important for young children.

Picture Books

Read more of Norah’s post via Plant the seeds of literacy — Norah Colvin

Thankful Thoughts . . .

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Illustrated by Dayne Sislen @2014

Each year at this time of year, I take a little time to think about the things that make me thankful. Of course, my wonderful husband and family come first, then supportive friends and my dear patient dog. After that, I think of good health, my warm home and nourishing food. This year I can not help but worry about and pray for those whose lives are not as comfortable and happy as mine. I wish them a Happy Thanksgiving and holiday season filled with peace and love.

I am also grateful for the supportive community I have found in children’s literature,  and publishing. We support and help each other through setbacks and cheer on each success. It’s wonderful to surround myself with talented like-minded people. I am thankful to have a creative and fulfilling job I love, illustrating children’s books.

I think children’s books are important. Children are the building blocks of the human race and the future of the world. Reading is important to build knowledge, imagination and self-confidence.

Happy Thanksgiving to all.

Dayne

Gigi and Grandma Remember, by Maggie Konopa, illustrated by Dayne Sislen ©2016

Gigi and Grandma Remember, written by Maggie Konopa, illustrated by Dayne Sislen. ©2016

 

Thank You, Jim Trelease! – The Power of Reading Aloud to Children

I believe that reading to your children is one of the most important things you can do to raise inquisitive, intelligent, creative and informed kids. Bravo to Jim Trelease.

Oxford Tutoring

Picture copy.jpg My son, Matt, reading to my four grandchildren.

Reading aloud to my four children is one of the fondest memories I have of their growing up years.  They are all adults now with their own families and busy lives, but I have wonderful memories of cuddling on the couch with them, reading stories together, watching their eyes light up as we traveled to other lands and other times through story.

As a teacher, reading to my children seemed a natural part of the parenting process.  Even when they were babies, they would sit on my lap as we enjoyed books like Pat the Bunny.  As they grew older, we graduated to story books.  Some were fairy tales, some were Bible stories, but all were chances to bond together over printed word. They had their favorites that they asked to be read to them over and over and over. We went…

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1,000 books before Kindergarten

Start your child on the best path
for life-long learning.

I think this movement to encourage parents to read to their children very early in their lives is a great idea. The 1000 Books Foundation is a non-profit charity which was founded in 2013 to promote reading to newborns, infants and toddlers. It seeks to create parent-child bonding through reading.

Studies have shown there is a connection between early exposure to reading and early stimulation for brain development. The American Academy of Pediatrics urges parents to read aloud to their children daily. Reading to your children helps children with literacy and language skills. Spending time with your children each day in a shared activity strengthens bonding and development.

My local library has just started a  1,000 books Before Kindergarten Program. I know many library systems all over the U.S. and Canada have similar programs. This is something you can do with your children to give them a solid start in life. There are so many fantastic picture books and story books being published every year that you can discover together. You can also share your childhood favorites with your little ones.

Visit the 1,000 books before Kindergarten website They have instructions, activities, charts, reading logs, book lists and t-shirts. Start your child on the best path for life-long learning.

 

Maybe you have a picture book idea you want to publish. Contact me, I illustrate children’s books. I can help you navigate the complicated world of the publishing business.

 

Children are the building blocks of the human race.

Children’s Books Are My Life. I read them, I study them, I illustrate them and I write them. You might ask how children’s books can capture this much of my time and energy? Children’s books are important to me and they should be to you also. 

There's a Mouse on My Head Children's Picture Book

There's a Mouse on My Head

Picture book I illustrated for Donna Warwick

Children are the building blocks of the human race.

Educating our children to guide them to become the future leaders, innovators and educators of our world is one of the most important things we can do.  Children’s books help young humans form their early outlook on life, their opinions and values. Children’s books expand a child’s world beyond the four walls of their home. They prepare a child for a life of learning and interaction with other children. They help children become open-minded, educated and responsible adults.

Quiet reading time or taking a child to the library or a favorite books store should be a treat. It’s important to foster an early positive love of books and the wonderful world held between their covers. Books should hold a precious place in every home. Our children are our future, we need to make sure they have the best education, wide experiences and open minds to become our next generation of adults.

My love of books has translated into my career. I have always been a creative thinker and a creator. I love the rhythm of words and the look and smell of them on the printed page. I love to take a complicated problem and make it easy to understand with a few simple illustrations and words. My background in graphic design and art direction in the world of advertising gives me an advantage in illustrating and designing children’s books.

 

Don't be a Pig in a Panic! by Leila Leidke

Don't Be a Pig in a Panic!

Picture book I illustrated for Leila Leidke

I love working with publishers and authors to develop characters and bring stories to life. I use my skills in art direction, graphic design and problem solving together with my children’s book illustrations to help authors develop their characters and design their book covers. I design and incorporate the text into the page illustrations for beautiful spreads. For self-publishing authors, I can create the whole package, working directly with your printer, publisher or POD company, so you get the best results possible.

Visit my web site portfolio:www.behance.net/DayneSislenDesign or my website for more information:www.daynesislendesign.com or email me directly:

 Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m off to the playground to get inspired…

 

Why children’s picture books are so important.

Of course, I’m prejudiced, my passion and my job are to write and illustrate children’s picture books.

But why do I feel they are so important for children? We all want what is best for our children, picture books start the process of learning and appreciating art at a very young age.

Mother and children reading before bedtime.

The illustrations in Picture books help very young children understand the story and encourage them to use their imagination to expand beyond the story.

As children start to learn to read on their own, the pictures help with comprehension and to decipher the meaning of unfamiliar words. The stories in picture books are not necessarily simpler than chapter books, in fact, they are richer because the pictures can tell a lot of the details of the story.

Picture books help children to explore interesting words in language, rhythm and rhyme at an early age. Repetition allows a child to anticipate words and actions, so they become a part of the story. Not only do children hear the story, they see the illustrations and touch the pages. They become excited that they can guess what an upcoming action or sound will be.

Picture books nurture, they can teach useful tools for dealing everyday life. When a child reads and sees  a picture book about a child or young animal dealing with an age-appropriate problem, they learn about problem-solving and cause and effect.

Picture books allow a very close relationship between child and parent or grandparent and child. Picture books are the perfect prop to make together-time and reading time, a special time to look forward to. A time to relax and settle down for bedtime. There is little pressure with picture books, the stories are meant to be fun and interactive.

If you have written a children’s book, contact me we can talk. I illustrate picture books for other authors.

Don't Be a Pig in a Panic!

Don’t Be a Pig in a Panic! written by Leila Leidke illustrated by Dayne Sislen

 

There's a Mouse on My Head

There’s a Mouse on My Head by Donna Warwick Illustrated by Dayne Sislen

In Praise of Picture Books by Randall de Seve

Some very insightful thoughts on Picture books. I love the comment by Patricia Gauch, “The Picture Book is an Act of Mischief.” I have always felt picture books had an important place in literature. This excellent blog post  justifies that belief very well.

Nerdy Book Club

I noticed something sad over years of teaching first grade.  As soon as children learned to read, they abandoned picture books in favor of what they imagined to be more impressive, or “grown-up,” chapter books.  I’m sorry to say that some of their teachers and parents did, too.

What many children (and the adults that guide them) don’t realize is that the best picture books can be equally, if not more, sophisticated than some of their longer kin.  Plus, you can have an entire picture book experience in a fraction of the time it takes to read a novel; said another way, you can have a wide variety of experiences in that same time.

So what, exactly, is this picture book experience?

“There is in a picture book, make no mistake, something for the eye, something for the heart, something for the mind, something for the funny bone, something for…

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A special treat for Mother’s Day.

The full video of “There’s a Mouse on My Head” is available on YouTube for a limited time.

Donna Warwick and I  have posted the full video of our book There’s a Mouse on My Head” on YouTube for you to enjoy with your little ones. Sing-a-long with the music and share it with friends. It will remain up through Mothers Day May 8th. Here is the YouTube link.

Our book focuses on imagination and the Grandmother/Grandchild bond. The book may be purchased in hard cover or soft cover from Amazon  or signed copies can be purchased in our Etsy Shop.

Donna Warwick is singing in the video and her cousin Sandy Weltman playing the uke! Of course all the illustrations are by me! Hope you enjoy the “story ‘n song.”

There's a Mouse on My Head Children's Picture BookIt’s also Children’s Book Week, so you don’t even have to be a Mother or Grandmother to view our free picture book video. ENJOY!!12524174_455257744678996_2433843190805924425_n

Behold the Art Show

What a wonderful way to introduce an appreciation for art and literature. I just love creative teachers. It’s amazing to see pre-schoolers doing this kind of art.

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A Teacher's Reflections

Children were sitting together as I carefully picked up each ‘masterpiece’, mounted and framed, and labeled with a title.  They knew this was IT, seeing the results of their love and labor.  I held up each piece, one at a time, as if it were the Mona Lisa.  Then, I slowly panned each work of art to the audience and simply said the title and artist;  “The Storm the White House and the Grass, by Dillon”, “The Big Scissors, by Hannah”, “Charlotte, by Ella”.  Twenty-two pieces of beautiful art, and each one brought spontaneous comments from their peers:  Eleni said, “That is so beautiful.”  Jackson said, “Whoa!”  Frankly, each piece of art they saw drew a wonderful comment.  When I asked children, “What will all these masterpieces look like hanging together on a wall?” Miles immediately shouted out, “An art museum!”  He was right.  After carefully hanging all the art…

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I Love Picture Books!

I love everything about picture books. The books themselves are short but they tell fully realized stories without using many words. The illustrations carry half the meaning, so all ages can figure out what the story’s about.

The words can be; colorful, noisy, irreverent, serious, silly, impertinent, sassy,  wriguldy-wrag, cheeky, and just plain fun to say. FYI: Wriguldy-wrag is a real word meaning mischief.

Images_Day the Crayons Quit_DaywaltImage_Where the Wild Things Are_Sendak Image_A Splash of Red_Bryant

Picture books introduce children to books before they can read. First, as a young child on a reader’s lap soaking up all the fun of the words and pictures. Second as a pretend reader, “reading” to a sibling or pet. At this stage, the illustrations act as a reminder for the words of the story and encourage visual thinking. Still later, when the actual written words start to make sense with the pictures, the children become real readers.

All you have to do to start children on the road to becoming a lifetime reader is start reading aloud to your kids, your grandkids, your nieces and nephews and any other kid you want to help. If we all do this, the world will be a more educated and tolerant place for all.

A not so secret confession: I love to read picture books out-loud in all the funny voices, even when I am all alone.

The books I’ve shown above are just a small selection of my favorites: The Day the Crayons Quit, by Drew Daywalt, illustrated by Oliver Jeffers; Where the Wild things Are, written and illustrated by Maurice Sendak and A Splash of Red, by Jen Bryant, illustrated by Melissa Sweet.

 

 

World Read Aloud Day is Coming

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February 23, 2016 is World Read Aloud Day.

Every year World Read Aloud Day calls global attention to the importance of reading aloud and sharing stories.

Scholastic is the Sponsor of Wold Read Aloud Day 2016. Here is a link to the Scholastic website where you can find information on hosting your own read-aloud event.

Reading aloud to your children and grandchildren has been proven to make them better readers for life. It expands children’s knowledge and imagination and helps with their concentration and verbal skills.  All of these things can help your kids excel in school and life. Plus it’s just a fun thing to do.

Calling all Book Lovers and Authors to Make a Difference to a Child in Need…

 

Reblogged on WordPress.com

 

Source: Calling all Book Lovers and Authors to Make a Difference to a Child in Need…

6 Tips to Encourage Your Child to Read

These six steps will start your children on the road to a lifetime of learning and reading.

  1. Read to children as often as possible. If you expose them to reading early and often, it will become a pleasurable experience they will want to repeat when they read on their own.
  2. Picture books can help struggling readers to comprehend a story before they can read all the words. Let them enjoy the process, without getting bogged down with the exact words. Let children ‘pretend to read’ using the pictures for guidance.SCBWI_Postcard_sm_sq_WP
  3. Encourage young children to write and illustrate their own stories. Children have great ideas, make sure they are able to express these ideas freely.
  4. Set aside family reading or story time. This can be a read-aloud by the parent or by an older child. As children get older, this time can set aside just for independent reading, for adults (yes, you too) as well as children. It doesn’t matter so much what they read, as long as they enjoy it. When children see their parents finding enjoyment in reading, it helps them to see the benefit.
  5. Discuss books. Encourage children to talk about the books they are reading, what they like about a book and even what they don’t like.
  6. Get your child a library card. Reading doesn’t have to be an expensive pastime. Take them to the library often. Make it as much fun to them as a trip to a toy store. Let them choose their own books to read.

MOYH_New ETSY SoftRead “There’s a Mouse on My Head!” with your child. Imagination is fun. Below is a quote from one of our reviewers.

“Mouse!” is the story of a special relationship between a grandparent and a grandchild. The grandmother is the protagonist. She’s a caring caregiver, a tough but cagey disciplinarian. The grandchild is the antagonist. He’s a clever kid who has no intention of eating his peas but has no such issues with pie.

A stuffed [toy] mouse comes to life, and a wisecracking sister enters the picture. High jinks ensue, and lessons are learned.

St. Louis Jewish Light review