Spring is a time of new beginnings.

Spring is a time of rebirth and celebration. Easter celebrates the resurrection or rebirth of Jesus Christ and Passover celebrates the liberation of the Israelites from Egyptian slavery. The ancients celebrated the return of the sun after a long dark winter.

What does spring mean to our children? Spring means a time of growth and new beginnings. Spring means more daylight hours to play in the sun. Spring and religious holidays can also mean a time to reconnect with family. Getting together with cousins and seeing grandparents again. Family connections are important to children. Children thrive on the feeling of belonging.

Spring growing illo

When children receive love and support in a warm family environment early on, they are better able to take on the childhood tasks of exploring their world and learning new skills. They learn from their family environment how to connect and interact with other people and build healthy relationships. These experiences help them establish more positive peer friendships and teaches them how to interact with other adults.

Reading together is the perfect way to form close bonds with young children. A time should be set apart for snuggling and reading out loud. Even children that have learned to read on their own enjoy being read to during story time with their family.

Have you written a special story for your children or grandchildren and have thought about turning it into a picture book? I love to talk to children’s book writers about the different paths to publishing. Traditional publishing to self-publishing there are a lot of choices to make and a lot of decisions. Fill in the form below with your questions.

 

The Magic of Storytelling

Today I have re-blogged Norah Colvin’s blog because it perfectly follows up with the idea of my blog Monday about increasing the attention span of children by reading to them. Nora is an outstanding teacher and talented writer from Australia. Check out her website www.readilearn.com.au


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“The Magic of Storytelling

Telling stories to and with young children has many benefits. Including other things, it helps to develop:

  • relationships with the storyteller and other listeners
  • language – vocabulary, language structure, imagery
  • understanding of narrative structure as it applies to fiction and non-fiction accounts
  • curiosity about one’s family, the immediate environment, and other places
  • empathy for others
  • interest in books and reading
  • imagination”

Continue reading Norah’s blog:  .via The magic of storytelling

How to extend the attention span of your children.

Kids today are bombarded with video games as well as fast action cartoons and movies. Picture book publishers are requesting shorter and shorter picture books for young children. No wonder our children have problems keeping their minds focused on one thing for very long.

What can you do to help your kids have a longer attention span? My advice is not some new technical invention or app for your phone or tablet, but something easy and inexpensive that you can do in your own home.

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You can extend your children’s attention span by reading to them.

What better way to show them you love them and help them at the same time. Kids love getting attention from their parents and grandparents. This one-on-one time without any distractions from phones or TV is important. Children can later illustrate the stories you read together so you have a visual reminder of the time you have spent together.

Reading books to your children:

  1. Helps their creative imagination to develop.
  2. Expands their vocabularies
  3. Instills a future love of reading on their own
  4. Gives children time to slow down and unwind
  5. Creates a bond between the child and the reader
  6. Gives you an opportunity to teach life lessons through discussions of the stories
  7. Improve reading comprehension so they get better grades in school
  8. Opens the doorway to creative writing
  9. Is not expensive

For older kids who are able to read on their own, establish a family reading night when parents and children each read their own books. TV and cell phones are off-limits during this time. When children see their parents reading they know how important it is.

See the thought balloon in the top right corner for comments and replies.

If you have written a children’s picture book and would like to discuss it with an illustrator, contact me below.

 

 

Why Grandparents Should Make Great Storytellers!

September 10th is Grandparent’s day.

So we have a guest post by Susan Day

Susan Day is a passionate author, educator and, of course, a grandmother. She wants to allow all grandparents to build meaningful relationships with their grandchildren. 

 

The role of grandparents has changed dramatically over the past years.Read out LOUD to your grandkids

Never before have we grandparents had access to some much time and resources. In fact, I’m of the opinion that we are in the ‘Golden Age’ of grandparenting, an era never before seen in history.

Without a doubt, we are truly blessed to be able to share our time and resources with our beloved grandchildren. We can speak to them in ‘real time’ across the globe, share photos and images online, as well as, interact in ways our grandparents couldn’t have dreamed of.

One of the most significant things any grandparent can do is spend quality time with their grandkids on a regular basis.

And, what better way to create long-lasting memories than by sharing books and stories?

Reading Out LOUD!

There are two ways to read a story to your grandchildren. 

The first way involves just reading the words on the page in an effort to inform and convey the meaning of the story. To be honest, this is quite boring. Sure, you are reading to them, but are you really connecting with them?

The other way – a truly more fantastic way – is to read out LOUD!Reading funny story out loud

And, I mean really loud and engaging.

Don’t just read the words.

Instead, live and act them out.

Use your voice to bring to life the storyline, as well as, the characters. Give each character a different sounding voice to add more meaning to what they are saying.

And, don’t forget to stop at the end of the page or chapter to add more suspense. You could even stop mid-sentence and ask your grandchild if he or she knows what is going to happen next.

Stop and discuss the illustrations as you go. Use them to put the story into context. For example, you might say, “Look, the little pig has built a house of straw.”

Learning to Become a Great Storyteller 

Not everyone is born a natural storyteller. Some people find it natural to just sit down and unravel an amazing story from out of thin air.

If you are very good at telling stories, then go forth and confidently share your skills with your grandchildren.

If not, don’t despair.

By simply practicing your storytelling skills you will improve. While you are reading, look for ways where you can improve. As you get more practice, your skills and then your confidence will improve.

You will know you are doing the right thing when your grandchildren cry out for more when you’ve finished reading to them.

Our grandchildren have more and more things to distract their developing minds, and many are not learning the necessary literary tools they need to enhance their educational chances.

As grandparents, we have the opportunity and the means to bring books alive in an effort to make reading more enjoyable and rewarding. Our grandchildren should not only love reading but be excited about writing and using the written word as a powerful tool to connect with others.

Together we grandparents can really make a difference.

More about Susan Day

 Susan lives in country Australia with four dogs, three bossy cats, three rescue guinea pigs, and an errant kangaroo.

Discover what the Top 10 Things Happy Grandparents Never Regret Doing.10 Things Happy Grandparents Never Regret Doing