Is your your self-published children’s book doomed for failure?

Some self-published children’s books look unprofessional because of the poor quality of the illustrations. It won’t matter that your book is well written, has great characters, and a terrific plot. Customers will only see the cover. All your hard work will be judged not worthy in a few seconds.

Self-published children’s books need professional illustrations. I encourage you to hire a professional illustrator/designer to present your book in the very best possible light. Hiring a professional will give your book an advantage over books illustrated by amateurs. So give your book a fighting chance and find a pro to do the job. It is important for self-publishing authors to choose their illustrator carefully. After all, with a picture book, the illustrator is telling one-half of your story. The illustration on the cover and the cover design will either encourage or discourage customers to pick up and buy your book. The inside illustrations will keep a child’s attention on the story and please the reader of the book.

A beautifully illustrated cover will add credibility to your picture book. Reviewers will be more likely to give it their time. Parents and grandparents will pick your book up off the shelf (or the Amazon page) and want to buy it.

Screen Shot 2018-08-05 at 1.36.30 PMIf you are self-publishing a picture book you might wonder why children’s books need illustrations. Most authors really don’t want to spend the extra money to hire a professional illustrator. There is one very popular children’s book on the market now called “The Book With No Pictures” by B.J. Novak. It doesn’t use pictures but it does rely on cleverly designed typography to keep kids interested.  The words on the page graphically whisper and scream silly words. A professional book designer was used for the book.

Other than that one book, I can’t think of any other children’s book without pictures. Chapter books have only a few illustrations. The cover, of course, and maybe at each chapter heading. The illustrations are there to just add a touch of interest and break up large areas of text. Lately, there is a movement to add more illustrations to newer chapter books. Some old favorites are being republished with more illustrations. Kids love them.

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Examples of chapter books

Picture books are entirely different. The illustrations in picture books play a major role. The illustrations provide visual clues that are important to understanding the story. On each page, the illustrations act together with only a few carefully chosen words to create a complete story that is understood by children and enjoyed by parents.

Don’t doom your picture book to failure. Contact a professional children’s book illustrator to present your book in the most desirable way.

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Examples of picture books

There are many places to find professional illustrators. Try these websites: The Society for Children’s Book Writers and Illustrator’s website (SCBWI), The Children’s Book ArtistsChildrens illustrators, and Upwork.

I am listed on the SCBWI’s website (Dayne Sislen). I also have a website portfolio: http://DayneSislen.com

Contact me using the form below. I am happy to talk to you about your book. I am a professional children’s book illustrator and book designer with experience with picture books and chapter books. I promise not to share or abuse your contact information.

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A few of the covers I have illustrated and designed.

The Surprisingly Complex Principles of a Successful Picture Book

This is a re-blog of a wonderful post from Chronicle Books Blog. It explains some of the important things to remember when writing and illustrating children’s books.

If you are interested in Picture book writing and illustration, it will be worth your time to visit their site to read the whole blog post.  http://www.chroniclebooks.com/blog/2012/02/17/over-and-under-the-snow/

The illustration below was created by Silas Neal for “Over and Under the Snow” written by Kate Messner .

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Contact me to talk about your story idea. I’d love to illustrate your story and design your book. My illustrations can bring it to life on the page. Dayne Sislen, Children’s book and product illustrator and designer.

 

First step to illustrate a picturebook

Character studies:

This is my favorite part of the process. This is the part where I read the manuscript over and over until I  become completely familiar with each character. If I am illustrating directly for a self-publishing author, I also listen carefully to what the author says about the characters and scenes. If I am working for a publisher, the author has very little input, I work with the publisher’s art director. The book I am working on now is for a self-publishing author. It’s about a ‘Round’ little girl who wants to be a ballerina butterfly in the school play. Olivia, all the kids in her class who tease her, the teacher and her very wise grandmother are characters. I will also be illustrating Olivia’s grandmother’s garden, the school room and Olivia’s bedroom.

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I wasn’t kidding about Illustrating ballerinas

The book I am now illustrating . . .

is about a ’round’ little girl named Olivia Catherine Amanda Mae Brown who wants to be a ballerina butterfly in the school play. It’s a darling story. She is so cute and ’round’. I love drawing her cute little shape. The name of the book is “Round,” by Shervonne Taylor Bonnell. I am now at the character development stage. I have Olivia’s grandmother, her teacher, the mean girls and other children in her class to create, as well as her grandmother’s garden and the classroom. I will then start the thumbnail dummy to see where all the spreads break in the story and what illustrations I need to draw. I just love starting a new book!

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