Cover of Some Writer, The Story of E.B. White by Melissa Sweet

Another Spectacular Book by Melissa Sweet

A book review though an illustrator’s eyes by Dayne Sislen

The cover for SOME WRITER! a Biography of E.B. White written by Melissa Sweet.

My last post was a book review of the fun book, BALLOONS OVER BROADWAY, also by Melissa Sweet. On that post, I received a great comment from Jennie Fitzkee, a teacher and the writer of the wonderful blog, “A Teacher’s Reflection.” She asked if I had also read SOME WRITER! The story of E.B. White, by Melissa Sweet, published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company in 2016. I immediately put myself on the request and pick-up list at my local library. I finally was able to get my hands and eyes on the book this week.

A spread for the book SOME WRITER! by Mellissa Sweet.

I absolutely love reading and looking at this book. Every page is a joy to behold. SOME WRITER! The Story of E.B. White is an incredible middle-grade biography of E.B. White, written and illustrated by Melissa Sweet. The book is beautiful to look at and intriguing to read. Melissa enjoyed the full support of E.B. White’s family for this undertaking, so it is filled with old photos and original hand-written and corrected first drafts of STUART LITTLE, THE TRUMPET OF THE SWAN, and CHARLOTTE’S WEB. Also included are early writings and journal entries. E.B. or Elwin as he was called when young knew he was a writer from a very early age.

SOME WRITER! is a delight to read and behold. Melissa has combined old photos, maps, original sketches of book covers, three-dimensional objects and her wonderful illustrations in her graphics. Every page is a feast for the eyes. I hope you enjoyed this book review from an illustrators perspective.

Balloons Over Broadway

A picture book review.

I just love the picture book, BALLOONS OVER BROADWAY. It’s a story about Tony Sarg, the first innovative puppeteer of Macy’s famous parade on Thanksgiving Day. It was written and illustrated by Melissa Sweet, who is one of my favorite illustrators. This is not a new book it was published in 2011, but you might say it’s new to me. I heard a lot about it when it first came out, but had never really took the time to study it carefully. With the self quarantine, I have more time to really study, well written and designed children’s books. This one is now a must buy for my home collection.

“But what if the controls were Below and the puppets could rise up?”

–Balloons Over Broadway

BALLOONS OVER BROADWAY is a work of art, both for the writing, the research and the delightful illustrations and models. I didn’t know the story about the first Macy’s parade and didn’t know Tony Sparg’s part in making it SPECTACULAR. I don’t want to spoil it for you, but every page is a delight for the eyes. If I was my five year-old past self, I would be collecting materials right now to make my own puppets and marionettes. I hope you enjoyed this review.


Dayne Sislen Illustrator

I illustrate picture books for authors and publishers. If you would like to talk to me about illustrating and designing your picture book, fill in the form below. I like to talk to children’s book authors.

It’s an exciting time of year for children’s book awards.

There are two very important children’s book awards given annually by the American Library Association. Everyone involved in children’s literature awaits this event each year. The author and illustrator choose are given a great honor. These books are considered the best of the best. They are both very coveted awards.

The Newbery Award

When You Trap a Tiger

The Newbery has been awarded annually by the ALA since 1922 “to the author of the most distinguished contribution to American literature for children.” There is a medal winner and usually from one to five honor books, which I list below the medal books. Sometimes referred to as the “Newbery award,” the Newbery Medal is the oldest and most prestigious children’s book award given in the United States.

Would you make a deal with a magical tiger? This uplifting story brings brings Korean folklore to life as a girl goes on a quest to unlock the power of stories and save her grandmother.

The Caldecott Award

We are Water Protectors

The Caldecott has been awarded annually by the ALA since 1938 “to the artist of the most distinguished American picture book for children.” Like the Newbery, there is one medal winner and usually a number of honor books, which I list below the medal books. Also known loosely as the Caldecott award, winners are likely to stay in print indefinitely due to the Caldecott’s prestige.

Inspired by the many Indigenous-led movements across North America, We Are Water Protectors issues an urgent rallying cry to safeguard the Earth’s water from harm and corruptiona bold and lyrical picture book written by Carole Lindstrom and vibrantly illustrated by Michaela Goade.

I love seeing the books that are chosen for these awards each year. I can’t wait to read them.

The Birth of a Picture Book III

Third in a series called, The Birth of a Picturebook: About the picture book The Cow Cocoon, written by Rachel Nolen and Maria Price. In Birth of a Picture Book I talked about writing the creative brief, the contract, then the character studies, the dummy, and the flat storyboard.

Inside pages from The Cow Cocoon.
Inside spread, The Cow Cocoon.

After the contract is signed, the characters and page breaks are approved, everything starts to come together. Birth of a Picture Book II talked about planning and drawing the rough sketches and coloring the illustrations. In The Birth of a Picture Book III, I will talk about designing the text and putting everything together in a digital form that complies with your POD or printer’s exact specifications and other elements needed to promote a book.

6. The next step is to design the text part of the book. The line work and painting part of the illustrations take a lot of time. During this time I also format the book’s text to make sure it fits perfectly on each page. If you are hiring an illustrator only, they may not want to do this part. I am both an illustrator and a graphic designer. I like to control the design of the pages and make sure the formatting conforms with exactly what the printer needs to print your book to the best of their ability.

7. At this point you can see exactly what each page will look like when printed. Now is the time for serious nick-picking. It’s too late to make major changes at this time, but small adjustments can be made before the book goes to print. You want to find any issues before you get your final proofs from your printer. The longer you wait to make corrections the harder and more expensive things are to change.

8. When everything has been carefully checked and approved by the authors, I will upload the digital files to the printer of choice. I work with each printer to make sure the files are perfect for their purposes. Each printer has an exact set of specifications to follow. The last 1/3 payment is due upon approval of all the illustrations and digital files. When the proofs arrive, I carefully check all the artwork to make sure the printing will run smoothly.

9. Included with each picture book I illustrate I include: A digital image of the cover suitable for marketing and promotion, an isolated image of the main character taken from the cover to use for promotion, and the title image isolated. Written publication copyright is also included for all images when used to promote the book illustrated.

10. Extras: Sometimes authors want extra illustrations to help with their promotions. I have designed and illustrated posters, bookmarks, brochures, banners for websites, author websites, package designs, and stuffed animals or character dolls. I also design and create logo designs for the new publishing company you are creating. These are separate jobs and are charged by the hour.

11. Become friends with each author I work for. It takes about 6 months to finish illustrating a picture book from a written contract to finished proofs. During that time I hope to form a lasting friendship and partnership with each author. I like to follow their publishing journeys and successes.

I hope you learned something from this series of blogs: The Birth of a Picture Book I, The Birth of a Picture Book II, and The Birth of a Picture Book III. You can contact me through my website: DayneSislen.com

Cover for The Cow Cocoon picture book

The Cow Cocoon can be purchased after February 1, 2021 at: www.cowcocoon.com

If you have a picture book manuscript that needs illustration, design, and formatting contact me through my website: www.DayneSislen.com

The Birth of a Picture Book II

Continuing the story of The Birth of a Picturebook: The Cow Cocoon, written by Rachel Nolen and Maria Price. In Birth of a Picture Book I talked about writing the creative brief, the contract, then the character studies, the dummy, and flat storyboard. After the contract is signed, the characters and page breaks are approved, everything starts to come together.

The Cow Cocoon picture book. Truman and Mooma are safe.

4. It’s now time for the rough pencil full sized sketches for each spread. I really like this part. All the parts we have only talked about before come together in rough form. This is a good time for the authors to make final adjustments and re-think direction. Everything is easy to change at this point. The text may even need to be adjusted slightly to help the action on the page. The action must move from left to right on each spread. Surprises or revelations are anticipated with each page turn. This part takes a bit of time. It starts very rough with small sketches, then becomes more and more refined with each step. When this stage is completed to the author’s satisfaction, it’s time for the second 1/3 payment.

5. Now after months of work, the final linework and color painting are started. In some illustrations the linework is very important and forms the basis for the illustrations, in other illustration styles, the color and tone are more important and the lines become covered up and incorporated into the painting. This stage takes me the longest time. The way I work is very time-consuming. I mostly work digitally but also incorporate traditional media for certain areas. Because the sky was almost another character in The Cow Cocoon, I used traditional watercolor for the sky in most of the illustrations.

I like to first design the title text font and paint the cover so the authors can start doing early marketing for their book. Occasionally there may be slight tweaks to the cover later in the process because the characters sometimes evolve as the story is worked on. I give the authors updated versions of the cover as things change. I show the authors my progress at each step so there are no surprises at the end. It is very difficult and time consuming to change illustrations once they are colored. It’s much better to make changes at the rough and pencil stages.

I will continue the next steps of this picture book journey narrative in my next blog post on December 21, 2020. See The Birth of a Picture Book III. Also, read the previous post on this subject: The Birth of a Picture Book I

Cover for The Cow Cocoon picture book

Go to www.cowcocoon.com after February 1, 2021 to get your copy

If you have a picture book that needs to be illustrated and designed, contact me through my website: www.DayneSislen.com

The Birth of a Picture Book I

I have been extremely lucky to have an exciting project to work on during the quarantine. It has given me a reason to jump out of bed in the morning eager to start a new day.

Picture book cover, The Cow Cocoon
The finished cover of The Cow Cocoon

Rachel Nolen and Maria Price came to me with the darling manuscript for The Cow Cocoon. Our first meeting was at a local park. We wore our Covid-19 masks and kept socially distanced. I could tell they had given The Cow Cocoon story, characters, concept, and marketing a lot of thought. They were excited about the project and their excitement very quickly got me onboard. Rachel and Maria made a great team and I wanted to be part of their journey.

View from Windegger Shelter in Tillis Park
View from Windegger Shelter in Tillis Park
  1. We worked on a brief together so I could understand exactly how they envisioned the characters, the target audience, the marketing plan, and their plans for printing and distribution. After working out the details of what they wanted me to do for them and their time schedule. I wrote up a simple contract in plain English that explained each step, the costs involved, when they were due, and the time schedule. A contract is important to begin each job. It protects the author and the illustrator. This way there aren’t any ugly surprises in the process. The first 1/3 payment of my total fee is due at contract signing.
  2. Character Design. Now the fun began. This is the most important step in illustrating a picture book and the one I love the best. The characters in a picture book drive the story. The characters are what attracts readers to the book and make the story come alive. The words themselves will make them want to read the book over and over. We worked back and forth to develop the personality of each character.
Characters for the book: THE COW COCOON
A few of the characters for The Cow Cocoon

3. The book layout or dummy is the next step. This is the hardest step for me. I must figure out how each spread will break so the story has excitement with each page turn. Sometimes this breakdown is not evident by reading the manuscript alone. I like to make a tiny 32-page dummy out of two sheets of folded and cut typing paper (see picture below). This gives me an idea of which pages are next to each other and if the action is lagging or too repetitious. I also do a storyboard which is a scaled-down flat version of the book. Below is the rough dummy storyboard from another book I illustrated several years ago for Donna Warwick called There’s a Mouse On My Head!

A tiny dummy made out of typing paper.
A tiny folded dummy to show page breaks.
Breaking down the page turns for a picture book
Storyboard, breaking down the page turns for another picture book

Seeing the story sequenced on each page helps identify areas of the story that need more action or excitement. I suggest authors try this with their manuscript to help them pace their story. At this time we sometimes need a meeting to adjust the manuscript slightly to best serve the page breaks. This can usually be done by moving a few sentences or changing the location where the action takes place.

I will continue this picture book journey narrative in my next blog post, Friday, December 18, 2020. See The Birth of a Picture Book II and the third installation on Monday, December 21, 2020, See The Birth of a Picture Book III

Cover for The Cow Cocoon picture book

The Cow Cocoon picture book can be purchased after February 1, 2021, at: www.cowcocoon.com

If you have a picture book in need of illustration and design, contact me through my website: DayneSislen.com

My quarantine has been a time of growth and renewal

I haven’t posted on this blog since March when the quarantine was new. No one really knew what we were going into. Would it last a few weeks, a month, two months, or more? Well, now we know this is not going to be a quick fix. There is no telling when life will be back to normal.

I have used my time wisely. I have not heavily scheduled every minute, but have given myself time to breathe. I have taken the time to enjoy the spring weather outdoors and now it’s summer. I have taken many online classes through SCBWI and SVS and listened to podcasts about subjects I am interested in. I have read books and watched far too much NetFlix.I  have given myself time to develop book ideas for picture books I plan to write and to nail down those elusive ideas that have been tapping on my shoulder for years. I never seemed to have enough time for my own projects in the past. I even managed to clean out a few closets and make a good start on cleaning the basement.

Sweet baby Ryan

Yes, I have missed seeing my family, who is spread far and wide. But with all the modern ways to stay in touch, it hasn’t been too isolating. My only regret is I haven’t been able to hold my brand new grandson in my arms. He was born April 2nd three weeks early right at the scary time of the quarantine. My son and daughter-in-law have been good about sending lots of pictures and videos. We Facetime and Zoom frequently, but I can’t hold his warm little body in my arms. I can’t smell his sweet downy head. I joked when he was born that I might not see him until he would be walking. I may not be too far off. We are hoping to see him in October if everything goes well in the U.S. with the virus.

I want to snuggle with him, read him picture books in all the funny voices, and teach him to be creative. It is so important for parents and grandparents to read to little ones starting when they are tiny. They should associate the loving, snuggling, and positive interaction with books and pictures.

Enjoying my self quarantine for now.

I’m sitting here all cozy in my home enjoying the peace and quiet. No restaurants, no movie theaters, no mall shopping, no church, no meetings, no going to work, no get-togethers with friends, I never thought this would happen in the U.S.

It’s a new reality for all of us. I believe it has brought out the best in many people. I found the hoards of grocery shoppers surprisingly polite and cheery. I had three people try to help me get the last can of my favorite soup from the top shelf way in the back. We all laughed about not having long enough arms. Of course at the check-out lines, everyone stays spaced to give sneezing and coughing room. In our small neighborhood of 27 houses, we have quite a few older couples and single ladies. Everyone is looking out for them. I set up a website with a community forum so we can communicate our needs, fears and offers to help each other.

I have taken all the closures in stride so far. The one that hit me the hardest was the library. It closed before I could really stock up on books to read. I have a large library at home, but I have read all of the books. I guess I will start reading them again, starting with the classics. Books on my iPad just don’t give me the same satisfaction I get with real pages.

WatercolorI have a new children’s picture book ready to start illustrating, so that will keep me occupied during the day. I’m always excited to start working on a new book. Sorry I won’t be able to share the sketches and finished illustrations with you until it’s published.Drawing on Wacom Tablet Watercolor illustration

Counting my blessings and hoping everyone stays well.

Dayne

Counting my blessings

Gigi and Grandma Remember, written by Maggie Konopa, illustrated by Dayne SislenIt’s that thankful time of year again. Day by day we scurry around doing what needs doing at the moment without taking the time to stop and realize our true blessings. When we truly think about it, it’s our relationships with our spouse or significant other, family, and friends that are the most important. Humans are social animals we need loving relationships. Good health and natural abilities come next. I also believe it’s a blessing to be able to help others. After these big blessings, it’s all the small things that bring us joy each day.

I enjoy being able to walk my dog in the park every morning with a group of hardy and supportive friends and their canine companions. I enjoy the changes in the weather we have in the Midwestern part of the U.S. When you walk 4-5 miles outside almost 365 days a year no matter what the weather, clothing choices are important. I find great satisfaction knowing I have made the correct choice of layers so I am comfortable. I’m surprisingly good at this, though I’ve been known to totally blow it big time.

I enjoy my God-given ability to draw and to paint. This talent gives me great satisfaction and I can also help others to achieve their dreams by illustrating their picture book stories. Whether I am illustrating my own picture book or a story for another author, I enjoy the challenge of taking written words and turning them into a visually compelling and interactive published book. I hope I am able to continue doing this for many more years. I also love to do artsy craft projects with children and adults.

Most times I’m someone who delights in staying home in my studio, but I also enjoy meeting and interacting with strangers. I like to see if I can turn an upside-down smile into a proper smile on a grumpy stranger. I love to entice babies and toddlers to giggle. I love to visit playgrounds and go down the slide or swing to the sky to the delight of the kids. I talk to strangers in check-out lines. I wave when someone lets me in traffic. Life is wonderful and I like to spread joy around.

Oh, let’s not forget, turkey, pumpkin pie, pecan pie, dressing, sweet potatoes, and Chocolate!

 


I hope everyone who reads this will make a list of things they are thankful for. Try concentrating on little joys in your life every day, not the “have-to-dos“ or the negatives.

 

If you would like to talk to me about illustrating your children’s picture book or designing an idea you have for a children’s product, fill in the form below. I like to talk to creative people.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Picture Book Critique Fest

#PBCritiqueFest

I always get excited when I hear of a new opportunity to have my work critiqued by professionals in the picture book field.  This new opportunity is called #PBCritiqueFest or Picture Book Critique Fest. It is open from October 3-25th, 2019. It’s a wonderful opportunity to have picture book manuscripts and dummies critiqued by professional picture book writers, picture book illustrators, author/illustrators and picture book agents. They have a facebook page: PBSpotLight. A Twitter handle: #PBCritiqueFest and a blog: http://www.PBspotlight.com

Below is a list of the fantastic participants:

AUTHORS:

Tammi Sauer

Josh Funk

Diana Murray

Alastair Heim

Corey Rosen Schwartz

Bridget Heos

Jessie Oliveros

Ann Ingalls

Laura Gehl

Susan Verde

Andrea Wang

Adam Wallace

Megan Lacera

Jody Jensen Shaffer

Rebecca J. Gomez

ILLUSTRATORS:

Brian Lies

Daniel Miyares

Cori Doerrfeld

Eric Fan

Rodolfo Montalvo

Jorge Lacera

Michael Rex

Yangsook Choi

Eliza Wheeler

Heidi McKinnon

Ebony Glenn

LITERARY AGENTS:

Jennifer March Soloway

James McGowan

Melissa Richeson

Adria Goetz

Lindsay Davis Auld

Mary Cummings

Tanusri Prasanna

Wendi Gu

Charlotte Wenger

Alyssa Henkin

Hope you can enter your original picture book manuscript. Good Luck.

 

 

The joy of working with a children’s book illustrator.

There's a Mouse on My Head

Book by Donna Warwick, illustrated by Dayne Sislen

by Dayne Sislen

Working with a professional children’s book illustrator is a fun process, you will see your ideas, your characters and your words come to life on paper for the first time. If you are planning on self-publishing your manuscript using Print On Demand (POD) like KDP Print or IngramSpark or an independent printer, you WILL need professional illustrations for your children’s book. A professional illustrator will help guide you through the process of self-publishing your book.

I usually start with character sketches for all major characters. Then I make preliminary pencil sketches to develop your story into spreads that move the action along. Your approval is needed for each step. Then I move into more finished drawings for final approval before committing to color. One-third of the total fee is due before each step of the process. The last 1/3 payment is due when I have completed everything to your approval and it is ready to send to your printer or publisher. I work in watercolor, pastel, gouache, oils and with digital brushes that replicate this media. We can discuss which media will work best for your needs. The illustrations for a whole book are usually worked on together, which actually saves time and money. Once I get rolling with the characters, the storyline and matching colors everything moves much faster and smoother. So doing one illustration at a time, isolated from the whole story will take more time and give a much inferior result.

Packaging everything: Putting all the finished illustrations and text together for printing or ebook setup is the last, big step. With my background in graphic design, I can help you here. I am able to deliver art in a publishable format, with the text and illustrations placed properly on the page, in a digital form ready for printing. I can create custom lettering and design the text to fit around the illustrations. I also work directly with your printer as a liaison to make sure the final book looks as good as it can with their equipment when it rolls off the presses.

Shark Dentists and Other Stories by Vincent Immordino Illustrated by Dayne Sislen

Written by Vincent Immordino, illustrated by Dayne Sislen

Book covers are very important!
Never ever let the image that sells you book look amateurish or lackluster. In many cases the cover is all a customer sees before deciding to purchase your book.

Below is a list  of the main points for a cover:

  • Be eye-catching
  • Look professional
  • Communicate the message of the book correctly
  • Work well at a small size for Internet sales, catalogs and e-books
  • Fit-in, or standout in a positive way in the marketplace for the specific genre

The perfect book cover design should hit the mark on all these points. Do people really judge a book by its cover? You bet they do.

Before I can give you a price on illustrating your book, I must see your professionally edited and formatted manuscript. If I feel your story will fit my style of illustration and I can create suitable illustrations that will best develop your story for you, I will agree to talk to you about your plans for the book. Picture books are traditionally 32 pages because of economical printing practices. That means I will be illustrating at least 12-16 full spread illustrations or 28 to 30 single pieces of artwork. That’s a lot of work, it usually takes me 4-8 months. This is how I make my living, it is my full-time job. Please set aside a reasonable budget and time schedule so your book can be illustrated to show off your wonderful story to its best advantage.

Gigi and Grandma Remember

Written by Maggie Konopa, Illustrated by Dayne Sislen

Illustration by Dayne Sislen

Illustration by Dayne Sislen

An important word about Non-disclosure:
If you are worried about showing your manuscript to a stranger. I am very comfortable signing non-disclosure agreements (NDA) prior to seeing your manuscript. So there is no reason to worry about your story. This protects your ownership of your story and maintains confidentiality. I can even provide standard forms, that may be amended to include any additional concerns you may have.

Contract: Once we agree on my fee and delivery date, I will send you a plain language contract that spells out schedule, payment timing, and assignment of publishing copyright for self published works.

Don't Be a Pig in a Panic!

Illustrated by Dayne Sislen

The final step: After I receive your final approval and the final one-third payment, I will place all the finished illustration files for your book in a DropBox* folder and email you a link where you can pick them up. If you have decided I should also be the one to package the files of your book with all text in place and provide digital files to your printer, I’ll email you an electronic proof of your finished book for your approval. Once approval has been received from you on the electronic proof then I handle sending your book to print using your choice of book publishing services. Your book will then be available for sale on Amazon.com, Barnes and Nobel and independent booksellers (should you choose).

Would you like to talk about hiring an illustrator your children’s book idea? Contact Dayne Sislen, below.

Yes, you really should hire a professional children’s book illustrator for your self-published book?

by Dayne Sislen

If you want your book to be able to compete with traditionally published books on the bookshelf and online you need a professional illustrator/designer to help. If you need help navigating the self-publishing process, you definitely need a professional illustrator/book designer.  If you want your book to reflect the high level of your writing it is very important that you find a professional children’s book illustrator/designer.

Great picture book covers

Some of the best current picture book covers on the market.

You’ve spent your time creating a fantastic manuscript for your picture book. You’ve hopefully, had your manuscript critiqued by critique groups, an editor and beta readers (who are not related to you), why do you need to spend money on a professional book designer and illustrator? Couldn’t that money better be spent on advertising or SEO for your author website? Why can’t I just have my teenaged neighbor illustrate my book?

It’s a known fact, book covers sell books.

If your book doesn’t look professional, if it doesn’t stand out on the shelf or the website of an online seller, forget it. All the advertising money in the world will not sell your book. After you make the “easy sells” to relatives and friends who want to help you out, your sales will come to a halt. If customers aren’t attracted to your book’s cover, they will not take a chance by buying it.

We all know the old phrase, “you can’t judge a book by its cover.” It’s true, the big publishers believe covers sell books. They spend mega marketing dollars testing out covers for their big-name authors.

Will a red background sell better than a yellow background? Should the main image be a close-up of the main character or show the character at a distance? As an indie author, you probably don’t have the funds or the ability to test market different covers. But ask any author who had a poorly selling book with a bargain-basement cover about the turn around in sales when they hire a professional cover designer/illustrator to design and illustrate a new an improved cover. The results are amazing.

The cover of your book is the first thing buyers see. From this first impression, they will judge the quality of your writing. Is this fair? No. But it’s a fact.

A few children’s books I have designed & illustrated.

Professional designers and illustrators can also help you to navigate the confusing and sometimes dangerous self-publishing process. They can save you thousands of dollars on printing and unneeded services that predatory and unscrupulous “publishers” try to convince you to purchase.

What do you have to lose? A lot if you don’t at least talk to a professional designer/illustrator about your picture book or chapter book cover. I suggest you contact a book designer/illustrator who is a member of The Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators (SCBWI.org) a well-respected international organization dedicated to promoting quality in children’s literature. In the SCBWI illustrator gallery, you can search by name, region (not all states bring results if they are part of larger regions, medium, style, etc. I am an active member of SCBWI and I am proudly listed under the KS/MO region.

You can contact me by sending an email (below). I would be happy to talk about your picture book illustrations.

How important is Humor in Kid’s books?

by Dayne Sislen

Humor is what makes something funny.
A sense of humor is the ability to recognize humor.

Dragon flying a burning kite

There is nothing quite as satisfying as reading a funny book to a child and watching them giggle and respond to the words and pictures. Reading to children increases their comprehension and reading funny books helps them to develop a keen sense of humor. Humor can teach children to become more creative.

Children and adults who laugh together are healthier and less likely to be depressed. A child with a well-developed sense of humor is happier and more optimistic. They have higher self-esteem and are more likely to be immune to bullying.

A happy mouse using toast as trampoline

Next time you visit your book store or library, pick up a few humorous picture books to share with your little ones. You will both benefit from the giggles and laughter that ensue. Happy reading!